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Podcasts That Connect the Dots

Tony Lockwood

Sponsored ContentDear DE Reader:

When Shakespeare’s Mark Antony says “lend me your ears,” he wants to roil the crowd into rebellion against the senators who had bumped off Julius Caesar. Nothing so drastic here. But lend the Connected Engineer podcast channel from PTC your ears. It’s great stuff.

The Connected Engineer’s premise is simple: A technological revolution in design engineering is afoot, and it could blow past you before you realize you’re another era’s relic. The podcasts are your chance to briefly hit pause and learn from experts what you need to know to make change work for you.

The Connected Engineer podcast channel brings together innovators, analysts and industry leaders to explore the latest trends in engineering and emerging technologies. Image courtesy of PTC.

The Connected Engineer podcast channel brings together innovators, analysts and industry leaders to explore the latest trends in engineering and emerging technologies. Image courtesy of PTC.

When DE listened in last fall, the Connected Engineer library offered nine broadcasts on diverse topics like augmented reality and autonomous vehicle development. All are still available for those wanting to catch up.

Four new podcasts have joined the library. They run from 16 to 23 minutes. All are void of hype and commercials. Access is registration-free.

In a Nutshell: The Connected Engineer

  • Podcast series for engineers, designers and trailblazers.
  • Analysts and industry-leading innovators explore latest engineering trends.
  • Four new podcasts added to library; 13 broadcasts now available; complimentary access.
  • New topics cover digital twins; smart, connected product design; five hot digital engineering trends and model-based engineering.

Learn more here.

Newly listed broadcasts include digital twins and designing smart, connected products. The digital twin podcast really gets down into this tricky bit of engineering methodology that increasingly more outfits are considering. Among its highlights are use cases that can help you understand that (a) you can do it and (b) it has potential to bring you an enormous payback.

The latter is particularly interesting because, well, IoT (internet of things). It’s huge. Everyone wants in. Yet many companies have a fuzzy strategy to get started or how to improve what they have. Here, you get a bunch of insights on key considerations whether you’re developing a new IoT design strategy or standardizing your existing approach.

Another, “How to Make Model-Based Systems Engineering More Usable to the Non-Traditional Engineer,” is the first of three planned podcasts on this topic. Non-traditional engineer is likely you—trained in one discipline but spending lots of your day working on systems of systems within systems that require other disciplines. What to do and how to organize workflows are some of the topics addressed here.

The big overview of emergent engineering workflows is the focus of the “Five High-Impact Digital Engineering Trends” podcast. Presenting data from a Forrester Research report, this podcast looks at what’s happening within areas like augmented reality in design reviews, digitalization and cloud-based PLM.

If you’re into being an engineer, listening to Connected Engineer podcasts is a no-brainer. Hit the link to start. You’ll be glad you did.

Thanks, Pal. – Lockwood

Anthony J. Lockwood
Editor at Large, DE

About Anthony J. Lockwood

Anthony J. Lockwood is Digital Engineering's Editor-at-Large. Contact him via de-editors@digitaleng.news.